Exports of defence-related products from Norway in 2014

‘The Norwegian defence industry plays an important role in value creation and in driving technology development. The Government therefore intends to continue to provide a clear and predictable framework for the defence industry based on a restrictive system of export controls on defence-related products,’ said Minister of Foreign Affairs Børge Brende.

The Minister of Foreign Affairs is today presenting the 20th annual white paper on Norwegian exports of defence-related products, export control and international non-proliferation efforts. 

In 2014, Norway exported defence-related products and services for military use valued at approximately NOK 3.4 billion. Exports of arms and military equipment accounted for NOK 2.9 billion of this, and other defence-related products for nearly NOK 650 million. Moreover, there were exports of dual-use items, in other words civilian products with military uses, with a total value of nearly NOK 200 million. The main recipients were NATO and the other Nordic countries.

‘Norway is a world leader in ensuring transparency about exports of arms and military equipment. The Government considers it important to maintain this level of transparency, and publication of the annual white paper is one way of doing this,’ Mr Brende said.  

In 2014, 20 applications for licences to export defence-related products were refused. Overall, exports of defence-related products were around 15 % lower in 2014 than in 2013. 

In 2014, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs tightened up Norway’s export control regulations and the guidelines for dealing with licence applications concerning the export of defence-related products. The new white paper clearly presents all current policy principles and assessment criteria. Under the export control regulations, the requirement to obtain an export licence has been expanded to include all products originally developed for military use. The white paper provides detailed information on exports of defence-related products. It also discusses Norwegian legislation and guidelines, and multilateral cooperation on export control and non-proliferation.

Over the past year, Norway has chaired the Missile Technology Control Regime, a voluntary association of countries working together to establish high standards for the control of ballistic and cruise missiles capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction. 

‘The work being done to prevent the proliferation of missile technology is unique and important as there is no legally binding international agreement on delivery systems for weapons of mass destruction. During this period, Norway has strengthened its dialogue with countries in regions affected by conflict and with relevant committees of the UN Security Council on issues relating to the proliferation of missile technology and on certain weapons programmes that have given rise to concern. Through this work, Norway is contributing to international security,’ Mr Brende said.