Historical archive

The fight against human trafficking

Historical archive

Published under: Stoltenberg's 2nd Government

Publisher Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Human trafficking is a serious problem in the Baltic Sea region. “It affects all the member states of the Council of the Baltic Sea States, is often linked with international crime, and must be combated in all its forms,” said Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre.

Human trafficking is a serious problem in the Baltic Sea region. “It affects all the member states of the Council of the Baltic Sea States, is often linked with international crime, and must be combated in all its forms,” said Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre.

Human trafficking is one of three priorities Norway has had on the agenda during its presidency of the Council of the Baltic Sea States during the past year. Both women and children are victims of human trafficking in the Baltic Sea region. A number of cases of human trafficking have also been observed in the labour market. 

“It can be difficult to distinguish between social dumping and slave labour,” said Mr Støre, when he summed up the Norwegian presidency of the Council of the Baltic Sea States at a foreign ministers’ meeting in Oslo today.

Norway has also had a special focus on maritime policy during its presidency. Shipping is important for economic development in the region. It must remain competitive and at the same time adapt to new environmental standards. Norway has actively promoted a transition to more environmentally sound fuels, such as liquid gas.

Norway has also worked to make the organisation more effective, relevant and visible. The Council of the Baltic Sea States is one of four regional councils in Northern Europe.

“The current cooperation structure in Northern Europe may not be optimal. We must be willing to assess the framework for this cooperation and make adjustments if necessary, particularly as regards the division of labour. Our aim must be to avoid duplication of effort so that our cooperation is as effective as possible,” said Foreign Minister Støre.

Germany will take over the presidency of the Council of the Baltic Sea States on 1 July 2011.