Munch 150 to be screened in more than 30 countries

The new art event film about the Munch 150 exhibition will premiere at over 900 cinemas in more than 30 countries on 27 June.

Edvard Munch: Self-portrait © Munch Museum/ Munch-Ellingsen Group/ BONO

The new art event film about the Munch 150 exhibition will premiere at over 900 cinemas in more than 30 countries on 27 June.

The film is designed to spark curiosity and provide insight for people who have already seen the exhibition, those who may be going to see it and those who will not have the opportunity to do so. 
 
In Norway the film is being shown in Oslo, Bergen and Trondheim. Internationally, it is being shown  in Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Guatemala, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK and the US.

The film was produced by award-winning documentary film-maker Phil Grabsky for his company Seventh Art Productions, and is presented by art historian Tim Marlow. Seventh Art Productions also made "Leonardo Live", a film about the London National Gallery’s exhibition "Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan", which sold out at cinemas in Oslo in 2012. 

For the Munch 150 exhibition, the film is a window to the world. It is intended to open the eyes of new audiences to Munch’s art.

“We hope the film will spark new interest in Munch and the exhibition, and perhaps create a new audience for Munch and Norway. This is a way of bringing a unique exhibition to the world, and we hope it will inspire people to plan a trip to Norway in the years to come,” said Jean-Yves Gallardo, Director of Communications at the National Museum. 

One exhibition – two museums

The film provides a completely different experience of viewing an art exhibition. Close-up shots of the works of art and interviews with a series of art experts provide the audience with in-depth insight into the exhibition itself and into Munch’s art.

“The film cannot, of course, replace the experience of seeing the exhibition with your own eyes, but it is a good supplement. It complements the exhibition – both serving as a teaser and providing more in-depth analysis,” Mr Gallardo said.  

The Munch 150 exhibition is the most comprehensive presentation of Edvard Munch’s art that has ever been shown. It presents key works from all periods of the artist’s life and provides an overview of his huge body of work. The exhibition has been split and is being shown at two exhibition venues. Works from 1882–1903 are displayed at the National Gallery and works from 1904–1944 at the Munch Museum.