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Historical archive

UN COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN 27 FEBRUARY-10 MARCH 2005

Historical archive

Published under: Stoltenberg's 2nd Government

Publisher Ministry of Children and Equality

CEDAW is one of the most important tools for improving gender equality. I am proud to announce that within the next three years we will seek to incorporate CEDAW in our Human Rights Act instead of in the Gender Equality Act in which it is incorportated today.

UN COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN 27 FEBRUARY-10 MARCH 2005

UN- CSW; New York 27. February – 10. March 2005

Dag: Onsdag 1. mars
10:00-13:00; Generaldebatten – innlegg
UN- CSW; New York 27. February – 10. March 2005

Ministry of Children and Equality, Norway
DRAFT 27.02.2006

STATEMENT OF NORWAY
KARITA BEKKEMELLEM, Minister of Children and Equality

Madam Chair, fellow delegates,

CEDAW is one of the most important tools for improving gender equality. I am proud to announce that within the next three years we will seek to incorporate CEDAW in our Human Rights Act instead of in the Gender Equality Act in which it is incorportated today. This will further strengthen women’s human rights in Norway.

There are three main issues I would like to address today: - women’s participation in decision-making processes, Security Council Resolution 1325, and finally reproductive rights for women.

My Government came to power four months ago. Gender equality has been high on our agenda from the very first day. We want to achieve gender balanced participation in our decision-making processes. It is an ambitious goal.

Norway’s new Government has therefore decided to make a difference. To set an example. Our government consists of 50 percent women and 50 percent men. In addition the Saami Parliament in Norway, has 51 percent women!

The Labour Party has decided that time has come to nominate an equal number of women and men to all politically appointed or elected bodies and electoral lists. In our view, concrete and binding measures are necessary to change the power imbalance between women and men. Voluntary agreements do not work!

This is why we have introduced a requirement of 40% rule of the underrepresented sex on company boards in private sector. From the first of January this year Norway’s 500 privately owned public limited companies have to comply with the new amendment in the company law. They have two years to meet this target, if not there will be sanctions.

Madam Chair,

Gender equality is one of four pillars of my Government’s Development policy.

The Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 in 2000. All efforts should be made to fully implement this resolution. Norway will launch its National Plan of Action on 8 March this year. Through this plan the Norwegian Government will strengthen, coordinate and systematise our efforts to promote women’s equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for creating peace and security.

And finally, Madam Chair,

The Beijing and Cairo Platforms gave worldwide attention to promoting women’s sexual and reproductive health.

Due to poor maternal care and health facilities, women suffer from unplanned pregnancies and abortions in large parts of the world. Women who have suffered abortion should not be condemned and penalised. At Beijing, the world community agreed to encourage Governments to consider reviewing punitive laws in this perspective. I would like to leave you with a plea: do not criminalise women who have undergone abortions!