Historical archive

CCS at Mongstad

Historical archive

Published under: Stoltenberg's 2nd Government

Publisher Ministry of Petroleum and Energy

The National Budget 2011

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a central part of the Norwegian government’s policy on energy and climate change. Since 2006 the government has worked with the aim to establish CCS at the Mongstad refinery at the west coast of Norway.

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a central part of the Norwegian government’s policy on energy and climate change. Since 2006 the government has worked with the aim to establish CCS at the Mongstad refinery at the west coast of Norway. The technology is being developed in two stages. First, a CO2-capture Technology Centre (TCM) is being constructed followed by a large scale plant as stage two. The Norwegian government has proposed to spend NOK 2.7 billion (aprox. 350 million Euros) on CCS in 2011.

The construction of the technology centre (TCM) is 50 per cent completed and testing is planned to start early 2012. At TCM two capture technologies (amines and chilled ammonia) will be tested on two exhaust gases containing different concentrations of CO2.

The Government is also committed to proceed towards the aim of constructing a large scale capture plant as soon as possible based on acceptable technical and environmental standards and a sound economic basis. The government has recently received new information related to the amine technology. Statoil which is one of the partners and operator of the TCM has presented information based on work i.e. in connection with the application for an emission permit at TCM. Statoil interpret the result of this work as a possible increased health risk related to the use of amines. Theoretical studies have earlier indicated health and environmental risks related to the amine technology.

Because of the increased uncertainty related to the amine technology, the government will evaluate alternative solutions for the project execution of the large scale plant. However alternative technologies could result in higher costs and longer planning phase for the project. The new information will result in a thorough evaluation of the project. The government will come back to the Storting (the Norwegian Parliament) on this matter before Christmas.