Historical archive

Research day at South Pole

Historical archive

Published under: Stoltenberg's 2nd Government

Publisher Office of the Prime Minister

“Scientific research going on at the South Pole is impressive. It produces knowledge and data that may be used by scientists all over the world, to take natural sciences further”, says Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg. He is visiting the South Pole 12-15 December.

“Scientific research going on at the South Pole is impressive. It produces knowledge and data that may be used by scientists all over the world, to take natural sciences further”, says Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg. He is visiting the South Pole 12-15 December.

On 13 December the Prime Minister visited several of the research centres at the South Pole. They operate within various fields of natural science, from climate to astronomy. The Amundsen-Scott Base is a research station run by the US National Science Foundation, hosting the Prime Minister’s visit to the South Pole.

“Today I have met with people performing important climate and CO2 observations, and developing new climate models. I have been briefed by scientists looking into outer space and back in time to right after the ‘Big Bang’ 14 billion years ago. And I have studied the IceCube telescope looking into the ice to observe neutrinos from space”, says Stoltenberg.

The South Pole is ideal for climate and CO2 observations, as the air here contain few disturbing elements. Scientists are looking for a baseline for the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere.

“This is vital research giving us knowledge to understand and solve the climate problem”, says Prime Minister Stoltenberg.

 
(Photo: Office of the Prime Minister.)