Travel Industry

The promotion of Norway at home and abroad, innovation and the establishment of new enterprises, cooperation, quality control and an increase in the level of knowledge are all central elements for the travel and tourism industry.

The promotion of Norway at home and abroad, innovation and the establishment of new enterprises, cooperation, quality control and an increase in the level of knowledge are all central elements for the travel and tourism industry.

The travel and tourism industry accounts for approximately 4% of the gross national product and 7% of the work force. It is an area where Norway has a natural competitive advantage. Travel and tourism is a major industry in many localities and has positive spillover effects to other local businesses.  Declining activity in traditional primary industries, such as farming and fishing, has created an increased interest in the travel industry and its possibilities for supplying and building a basis for maintaining the traditional industries.

In the last ten years, nature-based adventure tourism has accounted for the largest growth globally. This new trend harmonises well with what the Norwegian tourist industry has to offer. This gives the possibility for growth. Many countries are now focussing on tourism, and the competition in the market is increasing despite a rise in the total number of tourists worldwide.

The focus on the promotion and marketing of Norway as a travel destination is amplified through the launching of the revised strategy of branding Norway as a travel destination. This branding strategy will contribute to reversing Norway’s falling tourism market share and will raise Norway to a leading position as a destination for experiencing beautiful, pristine nature.

Norway is one of the few countries that have signed the National Geographic’s Geotourism Charter. By signing this charter Norway commits itself to developing tourism which protects, amplifies, and emphasises a location’s distinctive character; i.e., its natural environment and beauty, culture and heritage.

In addition to promoting Norway, the strategy will concentrate on the following areas:

  • The profitability in the travel industry depends upon the ability to develop products which meet the demands of tourists. Therefore, innovation is essential. In relation to other businesses, the travel industry is characterised by low levels of innovation.
  • Tourists want more knowledge and information from industry providers, resulting in a need for more investment in expertise knowledge
  • Cooperation between actors in the Norwegian travel industry is invaluable since tourists are increasingly requesting multiple-activity trips.

The Department of Industrial Development and Internationalisation, within the Ministry of Trade and Industry, is responsible for travel industry policy. Innovation Norway (www.innovasjonnorge.no) is a subordinate organisation of the department.