Norway House

With its 13 floors, 7 500 m² of modern architecture and exciting and varied interior, Norway House stands out as an impressive building in the EU quarter in Brussels.

Espen Brændsrød's "Vage terreng" is the first piece of art that meets you over the entry hall in Norway House. Juha Roininen, EUP images

The building at Rue Archimède 17 was reopened on Thursday 22 January 2009 following an extensive refurbishment project. With its 13 floors, 7 500 m² of modern architecture and exciting and varied interior, Norway House stands out as an impressive building in the EU quarter in Brussels.

Fasaden i rue Archimede 17 - slik bygningen så ut i 1968.

The front of rue Archimede 17 - as the building was looking in 1968.

With the Commission’s Berlaymont building as its nearest neighbour, Norway House occupies a central location in the EU quarter in Brussels where the main EU institutions are situated. Originally built as a hotel in 1968, Rue Archimède 17 has never been used for this purpose. Since the 1970s it has housed the Norwegian Embassy to Belgium and the Norwegian Mission to the EU, which have been tenants in the building for several periods.

Following its reopening in 2009, some 70 % of the building is occupied by the Norwegian Embassy to Belgium and the Norwegian Mission to the EU. The Norwegian companies Hydro, Statkraft, Statnett, Orkla and Agder Energi are also represented. Energy Norway, Norwegian Customs and the Storting have all opened offices in Norway House, which also houses the South Norway European Office and the West Norway Office in Brussels. This makes Norway House an important hub for efforts to safeguard Norwegian interests in Brussels and vis-à-vis the EU.

Between spring 2006 and December 2008 the building underwent a major transformation. Nearly 40 years after it was originally built, it was almost completely demolished, leaving only the floors and load-bearing elements, which were retained for environmental reasons. Now, with its stylish architecture and exciting and varied interior, Norway House stands out as one of the most modern buildings in the EU quarter.   

The facade is Jasberg granite with tones of grey and has large areas of glass. The main entrance still occupies its original central position, but has been accentuated by continuing the indented facade upwards for two more floors. A large glass bay projects from the upper floors and the roof terrace; like an open eye it provides a window on the world, offering a view as far as the Atomium – the landmark building originally constructed for Expo '58.

More information: To learn more about The Mission of Norway to the EU, please visit the official website: http://www.eu-norway.org/mission/