Increasing Competition to Slow Down Traffic

Stikkord: Areal og tranport, Kollektivtransport, Sykkel- og gangveier, Arealbruk, Sarpsborg

From 1991, emissions from traffic have increased by 33 per cent in Sarpsborg. Now the Municipality wants to make public transport more attractive than cars.

From 1991, emissions from traffic have increased by 33 per cent in Sarpsborg. Now the Municipality wants to make public transport more attractive than cars.

Integrating planning for transport and land use is the most important initiative to cut road traffic emissions in Sarpsborg. However, recent transport development shows that better planning for land use in itself is not sufficient as a means to reduce car use.

In addition, mechanisms must be provided to influence more directly the competition between different forms of transport, thereby influencing travellers’ preferences. This could strengthen public transport, cycling and walking and reduce car traffic.

Municipal Strategy

To reduce road traffic emissions the Municipality has forwarded a strategy with three core elements:

  • Developing a joint plan and guidelines for area allocation and infrastructure, so as to make city areas connect and grow together functionally. 
  • Developing a good public transport and a functioning network of roads for cycling and walking.
  • Developing Nedre Glomma to a dynamic city area.

Emissions from Road Traffic

Road traffic is the most important source of increase in greenhouse gas emissions in most Norwegian municipalities. In Norway in general, road traffic emissions increased from 7,7 million tons CO2-equivalents in 1991 to 10,3 million tons in 2007. Measured in percentage, emissions were up 35 per cent from 1991 and 2,4 per cent from 2006.