Aktiver Javascript i din nettleser for en bedre opplevelse på regjeringen.no

Historisk arkiv

Norwegian Health authorities does not warn against eating farmed salmon

Historisk arkiv

Publisert under: Regjeringen Stoltenberg II

Utgiver: Helse- og omsorgsdepartementet

The seafood consumption in Norway is high compared to most countries. Even so, one of the biggest challenges in the Norwegian diet is that we eat to little seafood – including fatty fish like salmon – not the other way around.

The seafood consumption in Norway is high compared to most countries. Even so, one of the biggest challenges in the Norwegian diet is that we eat to little seafood – including fatty fish like salmon – not the other way around.

The general dietary advice given by Norwegian health authorities concerning seafood reads: "It is recommended that people should eat two to three fish-based meals per week, of which half should be fatty fish."

The biggest challenge is still that the population eat too little seafood, and this applies to all population groups. Even with the high seafood consumption we have in Norway, the average consumption is about half of the recommended 100-150 meals of seafood a year.

Because of this, the Norwegian Health Directorate advices people to eat more seafood. There is a general consensus regarding the positive effects of eating fish on people's health. Fatty fish is one of the main sources of vitamin D and the long omega-3 fatty acids. Fish is also a good source of vitamin B12, iodine and selenium. This is especially beneficial for pregnant women. The consumption of fish, fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids can also reduce the risk of heart disease.

This week, Norwegian and international media seemingly have misinterpreted a new specification to the dietary advice concerning seafood. The specification does not warn against eating salmon, farmed salmon or other fatty fishes such as herring. The specification was made as a response to the concerns raised in media, about what constitutes a balanced diet when it comes to consumption of fatty fishes.

The specification reads: "Over time, young and pregnant women should keep within two meals of fatty fish, such as salmon, trout, mackerel or herring, per week."

The advice is to keep within 100 meals of fatty fish per year. Today, even Norwegians, which have a high seafood consumption, are not anywhere near this recommendation.

If you have eaten more than the recommended quantity of fatty fish this does not necessarily involve a health risk, but narrows the safety margins. These safety margins, however, are wide. The risk assessment is based on a worst-case scenario, so those who eat more than the amount of fatty fish recommended in our advice will also be safe.

It is recommended to eat farmed salmon and other fatty fishes as a part of a balanced diet.

(Last update: Friday June 21, 2013. 17.55)

Til toppen