The ILO Convention on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The main principle in ILO Convention no. 169 on indigenous peoples and tribal peoples in independent countries is the right of indigenous peoples to further develop their culture and the authorities’ obligation to initiate measures to support this work. Norway ratified the convention in 1990.

The main principle in ILO Convention no. 169 on indigenous peoples and tribal peoples in independent countries is the right of indigenous peoples to further develop their culture and the authorities’ obligation to initiate measures to support this work. Norway ratified the convention in 1990.

The ILO Convention no. 169 on indigenous peoples and tribal peoples in independent countries contains clear provisions on the right of indigenous peoples to themselves decide their own cultural development, to learn to use their own language and to establish separate institutions to represent them in relation to the authorities. The convention also recognises indigenous peoples’ wish and need for control over their own institutions, their own way of life and economic development. This means recognising indigenous peoples’ wish to maintain and develop a separate identity, language and religion within the framework of the states in which they live. The convention also contains provisions on land rights, employment and work, training, national insurance and health.

As the first country to do so, Norway ratified ILO Convention no. 169 by a decision of the Storting on 7 June 1990, and it entered into force on 20 June 1991. Among other things, it was decided that, for Norway, the convention applies to the Sámi people in Norway.

ILO -Indigenous and Tribal Peoples