Passports for children

Norwegian children must have their own passports. This is also recommended for travel within the Schengen Area (Europe's passport-free zone), since a passport is the only valid proof of identity for Norwegians abroad.

Norwegian children must have their own passports. This is also recommended for travel within the Schengen Area (Europe's passport-free zone), since a passport is the only valid proof of identity for Norwegians abroad. 

Consent of both parents 

When a person under the age of 18 applies for a passport, they must be accompanied in person by at least one of the parents with parental responsibility. The accompanying parent must be able to prove their identity. If both the father and the mother have parental responsibility both must consent to the child being issued with a passport, and the parent who accompanies the child applicant must bring both proof of identity (or a copy thereof) and the written consent of the parent not present.

A passport may nevertheless be issued to a child with the consent of only one parent in cases where that parent is entitled, under the Children Act, to take the child out of the country without the other parent's consent. If the Child Welfare Service has taken the child into care under Section 4-8 or Section 4-12 of the Child Welfare Act, consent shall be obtained only from the Child Welfare Service.

If, in connection with travel abroad, there is a risk that the child will not return, the parent may ask the court to issue an order prohibiting the child from leaving the country and requiring the surrender of their passport.

 

Nationality

Norwegian citizenship is a requirement for the issue of a Norwegian passport.

If one of the parents is a foreign national, it may be possible for the child to be issued a non-Norwegian passport by the embassy of the country concerned.

If there is a risk that the child may be abducted by the other parent, you may, either alone or in consultation with an attorney, write to the embassy of the other parent's country and ask them not to issue a passport to the child. There is no guarantee that they will comply with your request.

If you have any questions relating to nationality you can contact the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) or visit their website at http://www.udi.no.


What you will need to bring when you apply for a passport for your child

  • The child must be present in person (also babies)
  • A photograph of the child - passport photographs must meet specific requirements
  • Valid proof of your own identity 
  • Written authorisation from the other parent
  • Valid proof of identity (or a copy thereof) of the other parent 
  • Sufficient money to pay the passport fee

Surrender and confiscation of passports

The Passport Act  lays down rules for the surrender and confiscation of passports. If these conditions are met the police may demand the surrender of a person's passport. Should the passport holder fail to do so, the police may confiscate their passport. The conditions for passport surrender or confiscation include the issue of a wanted bulletin or arrest warrant, or a lawfully made decision by a public authority prohibiting someone from leaving the country.
 
If the circumstances give reasonable grounds to believe that the purpose of a person's journey is to engage in criminal activity the passport authority may demand the surrender or, if necessary, the confiscation of an individual's passport.
 
Read more about passports at www.politi.no