The Mine Ban Convention - Fact Sheet

The Mine Ban Convention is the international agreement that bans antipersonnel landmines. The text of the Mine Ban Convention was successfully agreed at a diplomatic conference 18 September 1997 in Oslo.

The Mine Ban Convention is the international agreement that bans antipersonnel landmines. It's official title is the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction

The text of the Mine Ban Convention was successfully agreed at a diplomatic conference 18 September 1997 in Oslo. 3 December 1997 a total of 122 governments signed the treaty in Ottawa, Canada. In September the following year, Burkina Faso became the 40th country to ratify the agreement, triggering entry into force six months later. Thus, in March 1999 the treaty became binding under international law, and did so more quickly than any treaty of its kind in history. By June 2007 the convention has 153 signatories and is still open for others to join .

The Treaty

The treaty commits member states to “put an end to the suffering and casualties caused by antipersonnel landmines”. Treaty obligations fall under two broad headings:

  • those that prevent future landmine problems e.g. a ban on mine use, production and trade, as well as the destruction of stockpiled mines; and
  • those that aim to solve the existing landmine problem e.g. clearance of mined areas, mine risk education and assistance for landmine survivors.

Obligations under the Treat

State Parties agree to:

  • never use antipersonnel mines, nor to “develop, produce, otherwise
  • acquire, stockpile, retain or transfer” them;
  • destroy mines in their stockpiles within four years of the treaty becoming binding;
  • clear mines in their territory, or support efforts to clear mines in mined countries, within 10 years;
  • in mine-affected countries, conduct mine awareness and ensure that mine victims are cared for, rehabilitated and reintegrated into their communities;
  • offer assistance to other States Parties for example in providing for survivors or in clearance programmes;
  • adopt implementation measures (such as national legislation) in order to ensure that the terms of the treaty are upheld in their territory.