Forced marriage and female genital mutilation

Forced marriage is prohibited by Norwegian law and contravenes human rights and international conventions.

Forced marriage

Forced marriage is prohibited by Norwegian law and contravenes human rights and international conventions. There are many indications that these marriages are mainly entered into abroad, but threats of forced marriage are a reality that both girls and boys may be subjected to in Norway. Helping those concerned to resist this requires continuous efforts on the part of both the authorities and civil society. 

Female genital mutilation

Female genital mutilation is a generic term for various types of operations, for reasons other than medical, on girls' or women's genitals. The practice occurs in several African countries, in the Arabian Peninsula and among some ethnic groups in the Middle East and Asia. Research shows that the targeted efforts over many years to prevent female genital mutilation have produced good results. Almost no girls born in Norway are subjected to this. However, very many of the girls and women who come to Norway from countries where female genital mutilation is practised have been subjected to this. It is therefore important to offer reopening and other medical and psychosocial follow-up to girls and women who have suffered genital mutilation, not least in connection with pregnancies and births. 

Forced marriage, female genital mutilation and other kinds of serious restrictions on the freedom of young people are forms of violence in close relationships. It is important to prevent children and young people in Norway from being subjected to such infringements of their rights. Read more about this in the separate action plan to prevent forced marriage, female genital mutilation and serious restrictions on the freedom of young people.

IMDi's website contains a lot of information on the work to prevent forced marriages.