The coronavirus situation: Questions and answers about entry to Norway

In order to limit the risk of imported infections, the government further tightened non-Norwegian citizens’ entitlement to enter Norway from on 29 January. In short, only those non-Norwegian citizens who are residents of Norway are permitted to enter the country. This also applies to citizens of the EEA.



General questions and answers about entering Norway

Most people cannot travel to Norway now.

Norway has introduced the strictest entry rules since March 2020. As a general rule, only foreigners residing in Norway can enter Norway and all Norwegian citizens (regardless of where they live). Some exceptions have been made to this main rule which we discuss below.

Most people cannot travel to Norway now without belonging to one of the exceptions. This applies to citizens of all countries, including citizens from the EU/EEA and Nordic citizens. This includes:

  • Tourists
  • family members not listed under the Exceptions: close family members section
  • boyfriend/girlfriend or fiancé
  • EU/EEA citizens (including Nordic citizens) who are going to work or study in Norway, and who do not belong to any of the exceptions listed below
  • persons who have been granted a residence permit to work or study in Norway and who are not already resident here
  • business travelers
  • foreigners who have been granted a Schengen visa, but who do not belong to any of the exceptions below
  • persons who have leisure property in Norway, but are not resident here

Below is a list of the exceptions. You can read more about each exception in the accordions below (we are still working on the details for the different exceptions.

List of exceptions:

  • foreigners residing in Norway
  • foreigners who have been granted a family immigration permit
  • foreigners who will visit or live with close family members in Norway
  • foreigners who are going to have scheduled contact with their children
  • foreigners who have special reasons that indicate that the person is given the right to enter, such as special care responsibilities for persons in Norway or other strong welfare considerations
  • asylum seekers and resettlement refugees
  • some occupational groups
    • journalists
    • sailors and aviation personnel
    • goods and passenger transport
    • diplomats and military personnel
    • Sami people during reindeer herding
    • researchers and crew on marine research cruises
  • foreigners with an invitation from the Norwegian authorities and employees in international organizations
  • foreigners who are going to stopover at an airport in Norway (both in international airport transit and within Schengen)
  • foreigners working in critical societal functions
  • health personnel from Sweden and Finland who work in the Norwegian health and care service
  • foreigners who is a permanent resident of Svalbard, or who needs to travel through the Norwegian mainland on his way to or from work or residence on Svalbard
  • From March 1st: Day commuters from Sweden and Finland will once again be able to come to work in Norway under a strict test and control regime.
    Day commuters must cross the border at an open border station within the station's opening hours.

List of exceptions:

  • foreigners residing in Norway
  • foreigners who have been granted a family immigration permit
  • foreigners who will visit or live with close family members in Norway
  • foreigners who are going to have scheduled contact with their children
  • foreigners who have special reasons that indicate that the person is given the right to enter, such as special care responsibilities for persons in Norway or other strong welfare considerations
  • asylum seekers and resettlement refugees
  • some occupational groups
    • journalists
    • sailors and aviation personnel
    • goods and passenger transport
    • diplomats and military personnel
    • Sami people during reindeer herding
    • researchers and crew on marine research cruises
  • foreigners with an invitation from the Norwegian authorities and employees in international organizations
  • foreigners who are going to stopover at an airport in Norway (both in international airport transit and within Schengen)
  • foreigners working in critical societal functions
  • health personnel from Sweden and Finland who work in the Norwegian health and care service
  • foreigners who is a permanent resident of Svalbard, or who needs to travel through the Norwegian mainland on his way to or from work or residence on Svalbard
  • From March 1st: Day commuters from Sweden and Finland will once again be able to come to work in Norway under a strict test and control regime.
    Day commuters must cross the border at an open border station within the station's opening hours

For detailed information please see UDI.no

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Further details

All Norwegian citizens are permitted to enter Norway.

Measures including mandatory testing, entry registration, quarantine and quarantine hotels continue to apply to those persons who are exempt from the restrictions on entering Norway, also Norwegian citizens.

These changes are the result of the current level of infections and outbreaks involving coronavirus mutations, and they are intended to serve as a temporary measure in order to bring the situation back under control. 

An undergone covid-19 is not an exception from the entry restrictions in the regulations relating to entry restrictions for foreign nationals out of concern for public health. However, foreigners who have undergone Covid-19 and have documentation on it are excempt from the  requirement of a negative SARS-CoV-2 test taken within 24 hours before arrival.



Question and answers for those who are still permitted to enter Norway:

Anyone returning from red countries must stay in quarantine for 10 days after the date of their arrival in Norway. This is referred to as travel quarantine. But there are some exemptions. 

Read more at Helsenorge

Yes. In order to improve infection prevention measures, all persons arriving in Norway must register prior to crossing the border. This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

Once you have completed the registration, you will receive a receipt which you must present to the police at the border control. 


Travellers must register prior to their arrival in Norway and may only register their journey within 72 hours of their time of arrival.

Yes. From Monday 18 January at 17:00, mandatory testing will be introduced at the border for persons who have been to an area that necessitates quarantine upon arrival in Norway.  

This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

The mandatory requirement to take a test is in addition to the schemes we have already established relating to requirements for traveller registration upon arrival and quarantine.

The requirement to present a certificate documenting a negative SARS-Co V-2 test result prior to arrival to Norway is being amended to require that the test is taken within 24 hours of departure (rather than the previous 72 hours). Persons who are travelling by plane can have test done witin the last 24 hours before scheduled departure time for the first part of the flight. The flight can be a direct flight to Norway or a continous flight to Norway with stopovers at other airports. This will open for travellers from other continents with longer travel time.

Furthermore, all persons who have been to the UK, South Africa, Ireland, the Netherlands, Austria, Portugal and Brazil must undergo a PCR test at the Norwegian border. 

On 26 March 2021, several changes were made to the quarantine hotel rules. The main rule still is that all persons travelling to Norway have a duty to undergo quarantine at a quarantine hotel. However, changes have been introduced as to which groups are exempt from this duty, and how long one must stay at a quarantine hotel. The most important change is that persons who are permanent residents of Norway or have a fixed residential address in Norway must stay at a quarantine hotel for the entire duration of the quarantine period if they come back after non-essential travel. They are no longer allowed to leave the quarantine hotel even if they present a negative result from a test taken three days upon arrival. In addition, new exemptions from the duty of staying at a quarantine hotel apply to persons who cross the border in connection with arranged or scheduled child visitation, as well as for foreign diplomats.

The exemption for parents and children travelling in connection with arranged or scheduled visitation comes into force on March 26. The other changes come into force from 00:01 on March 29. After that, the following groups will be exempt from the duty to undergo entry quarantine at a quarantine hotel:

  • Persons able to produce documentation of residence in Norway, and who are returning from necessary (essential) travel (check more information below). Quarantine must be completed in their own dwelling or at another suitable accommodation where it is possible to avoid close contact with others and stay at a private bedroom with a separate bathroom and kitchen or food service. Persons unable to document that their travel was necessary, must stay at a quarantine hotel.
  • Persons able to produce documentation they own or rent a fixed residential address in Norway where they can undergo quarantine in a suitable housing unit with a bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen, and who can document that the travel was necessary. Persons who rent a dwelling must have a tenancy agreement with a duration of at least 6 months.
  • Employees and contractors, for whom the employer or contracting authority is providing a suitable accommodation that was approved by the Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority prior to arrival. Documentation of approval must be presented upon arrival. For more information, please see: Approval of lodging for employees undergoing entry quarantine (arbeidstilsynet.no).
  • Persons who can document compelling welfare considerations, and who have a suitable accommodation where it is possible to avoid close contact with other people, with a private bedroom, a separate bathroom and a separate kitchen or food service. Upon arrival they must present confirmation that the accommodation satisfies these conditions, issued by the party providing the accommodation.
  • Parents and minor children crossing the border in connection with arranged or scheduled child visitation.
  • Asylum seekers and resettlement refugees who have separate arrangements.
  • Certain special arrangements are in force for long-distance hauliers, allied military departments, and employees on vessels at Norwegian ports.
  • Foreign diplomats as listed in the Immigration Regulations Section 1-4 or 1-5, diplomats with dual accreditation, and diplomatic couriers.

Additionally, persons who left Norway before 13 March 2021 can undergo the quarantine in their own dwelling upon arrival, provided they can document compelling welfare considerations as listed in Section 5 second paragraph (e). What constitutes compelling welfare considerations is further described below.

Persons staying at quarantine hotels when the changes in the Covid-19 Regulations come into effect at midnight March 29, and who in accordance with previously issued rules were exempt from the duty of staying at a quarantine hotel provided they present a negative result from a test taken no earlier than three days upon arrival, will still be exempt from staying at a quarantine hotel if they present a negative result from such a test.

Spouses, cohabitants and their joint children may stay in the same location during their quarantine period, without the requirement of a private room, if they are travelling to Norway together and live together in their home country.

 

Yes, persons undergoing entry quarantine are required to stay at the quarantine hotel at the initial point of entry. This entails that they are not permitted to travel onward from e.g., Oslo Airport before quarantine has been completed.

 

Necessary travel for persons residing in Norway or persons with a fixed residential address in Norway

Persons who are residing or who have a fixed residential address in Norway, are only exempt from the duty to stay at a quarantine hotel if the travel is necessary. Travel in connection with work, travel from a place of study abroad, or other travel based on compelling welfare considerations, is considered necessary. If one cannot document that the travel was necessary, the person arriving must stay at a quarantine hotel for the entire duration of the quarantine, or until a negative test result by a PCR test taken no earlier than seven days  upon arrival can be presented.

Necessary work travel:

For work travel to be considered necessary, one must present a confirmation from the employer. Self-employed individuals must present a confirmation from the contracting authority. A confirmation from a national team, club, or similar, will be considered sufficient documentation for professional elite athletes returning from travel connected with sporting activities.

Travel to and from Norway is considered necessary for Norwegian residents temporarily working abroad. The same applies to members of their household travelling with them. This will, for example, apply to foreign service officers stationed abroad and employees of the Norwegian Armed Forces ordered to participate in international operations. Travel to and from Norway will similarly be considered necessary for students who reside in Norway but are studying abroad, as well as the members of their household. Household members are spouses, cohabitants and children. The requirement that the persons must be residing in Norway applies also to the household members, but in cases where this rule applies, it is not required that the household members travel together with the reference person. Household members of foreign service officers stationed abroad are considered to be residing in Norway, independently of their stay abroad.

Persons who more than once during a 15-day period enter Norway from areas in Sweden or Finland with quarantine requirements, when travelling between their place of work and place of residence, are not required to document that their travel is necessary. They may undergo the quarantine in their own dwelling or at another suitable accommodation. If the person owns or rents a dwelling in Norway, but is not registered in the National Population Register as residing in Norway, one is required to undergo quarantine in a separate housing unit with a bedroom, a bathroom and a kitchen.

Necessary study travel:

Norwegian students abroad: Travel to and from Norway will be considered necessary similarly to work-related travel for students residing in Norway who are currently studying abroad, as well as for the members of their household. The requirement of residency in Norway also applies to household members.

Documentation: Sufficient documentation will be a student ID issued by the foreign educational institution.

Study trips from Norway for students enrolled at Norwegian educational institutions will be assessed in the same way as work-related travel, and may be seen as necessary if confirmed by the educational institution.

Compelling welfare considerations will, for example, be one’s presence at the birth of one’s own child, visiting a close relation who is seriously ill or dying, or attending the funeral service or burial of a close relation. Another example may be travel abroad in order to receive necessary medical treatment. Travel to visit one’s spouse, romantic partner or close relations who are not seriously ill, will not be considered as compelling welfare considerations in this connection.

Documentation: Compelling welfare considerations may be documented by a medical certificate or similar. In cases where no other documentation can be provided, the documentation requirement may be met by a self-certification from the traveller.

As a main rule, entry quarantine shall take place at a quarantine hotel at your point of entry to Norway. Persons who travel to Norway to perform work or assignments, and who can document that their employer is providing them with a suitable accommodation are not required to stay at a quarantine hotel. The employer must have received pre-approval for the accommodation. It must be possible to avoid close contact with other people, accommodations must have a private room with a TV and internet access, separate bathroom, and separate kitchen or food service.

  • The same requirements will apply in terms of accommodation whether this is for quarantine upon arrival in Norway, due to infection or isolation.
  • The government has therefore set out the same requirements in a statutory regulation:
    • It should be possible to avoid close contact with others, and there should be a private bedroom, dedicated bathroom facilities and a separate kitchen or dining area.
    • It is nevertheless important to recognise that the requirements in place for those who are isolating, as opposed to undergoing quarantine, are far stricter. They must isolate from all other persons in their own home or accommodation, and from other members of their household insofar as this is possible.

  • Municipalities will offer accommodation free of charge to those persons who are infected and must isolate when it is not appropriate for them to remain at home on the grounds of infection control. This will also apply to those in quarantine in quarantine hotels following their arrival in Norway.
  • It is important that municipalities quickly evaluate whether infected persons are able to remain in quarantine hotels or whether they should be moved elsewhere.

People staying at a quarantine hotel must pay a set charge of NOK 500 per night for private individuals and NOK 500 per night for employers. The remaining expenses will be covered by the municipalities who will in turn be reimbursed by the state.

 

The set charge to stay at a quarantine hotel is NOK 500 per person per night for adults. Children under the age of 10 stay for free with their parents, while the charge for children between 10-18 years is NOK 250 per child per night.

Yes, this charge covers full board, including meals.

No. On arrival in Norway, the Police will inform you of the requirement to stay at a quarantine hotel and, in cooperation with the municipality, you will be instructed which hotel to travel to.

This varies from place to place. Some municipalities arrange transport, while others do not. Travelling by public transport from the airport, port or border crossing to the hotel is permitted, but you must follow the rules related to infection control and prevention.

You will be provided with information about the quarantine hotel’s rules related to infection control and prevention on arrival. You must follow these rules, as well as the general advice about social distancing, wearing face masks and washing your hands thoroughly. You must avoid places where it is difficult to maintain distance. You should not visit public places like shops and cafés. However, you can leave the hotel to carry out necessary errands at the supermarket or pharmacy, but ensure you maintain a distance of at least one metre from other people and avoid queues.

 

No, there is no option of reserving a place at a specific quarantine hotel in advance. Upon arrival in Norway, the police will inform of the duty to stay at a quarantine hotel and will, in cooperation with the municipality, inform you of what hotel you should travel to.

If your employer or contracting authority does not have a suitable accommodation, your employer or contracting authority may reserve a suitable accommodation at a hotel on its own. However, this is not part of the quarantine hotel scheme, and such an agreement would be between the employer, employee and the hotel in question.