Enable Javascript in your browser for an improved experience of regjeringen.no

Historical archive

Norway increases support for prevention of violence against women and children in Bolivia

Historical archive

Published under: Stoltenberg's 2nd Government

Publisher Ministry of Foreign Affairs

“More than 70 % of women and children in Bolivia are victims of violence, most of them in their own homes. Norway is stepping up its efforts to respond to this extensive problem,” said State Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Arvinn Gadgil.

“More than 70 % of women and children in Bolivia are victims of violence, most of them in their own homes. Norway is stepping up its efforts to respond to this extensive problem,” said State Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Arvinn Gadgil.

Elimination of gender-based violence and domestic violence was on top of the agenda during Gadgil’s visit to Bolivia, where he met with the authorities and Norway’s cooperation partners. On 15 May, he met representatives of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and UN Women in La Paz to sign an agreement on increased cooperation. UNFPA will receive an additional NOK 5 million for its efforts to prevent gender-based and domestic violence, which includes work to strengthen the rights of indigenous people, involvement of youth organisations, capacity building of national authorities and to promote the inclusion of gender based violence in the national education system.

Gadgil, Nadal and Regner
State secretary Arvinn Gadgil (front middle) met, Jaime Nadal from UNFPA, and Åsa Regner from UN Women in La Paz 15 May 2013. (Photo: Astrid Sehl, MFA)

“The widespread violence against women and children both in cities and rural areas in Bolivia is of grave concern. The new domestic law to eliminate violence against women is welcome progress. Solid commitment and efforts are needed to addressing the root causes of this kind of violence. Measures need to be intensified in a range of areas, from educating men to making sure that offenders are brought to trial and punished,” Gadgil said.

Of almost half a million registered formal complaints from women subject to violence in the period 2007–2011, just 0.02 % led to a firm sentence. A large number of attacks also go unreported; according to the UN, 80 % of the violence against women in Bolivia is never reported.

Prior to his visit to Bolivia, Gadgil was in Nicaragua and Guatemala, where he visited a crisis centre, police reception centre and youth project supported by the Norwegian Government.

“Norway is actively engaged in promoting human rights in Latin America. On this visit I have particularly looked into ways to prevent violence against women and children as well as to strengthen the rights of sexual minorities,” Gadgil said.