The agreement on climate policy

Through the agreement on climate policy in the Storting, Norwegian politicians have adopted goals for climate policy and measures for how we will reach the goals.

Norway's climate policy is based on agreements reached in the Storting in 2008 and 2012 between all the political parties with the exception of the Progress Party. The agreements are a result of the broad political consensus that Norway shall take a responsibility for a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions through an active national policy. The agreement contains targets for emission reductions in 2020, including ambitions for national emission reductions and a long-term goal of restructuring Norway to a low-emission society. 

 Overarching objectives for the Norwegian climate policy

  • Norway will exceed its Kyoto commitment by 10 percentage points in the first commitment period.
  • Until 2020, Norway will make a commitment to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions by an amount corresponding to 30 per cent of Norway's emissions in 1990.
  • Norway will be carbon neutral in 2050.
  • As part of a global and ambitious climate agreement where other industrialised countries also make major commitments, Norway will have a binding target of carbon neutrality by 2030 at the latest. It means that Norway will ensure for reductions in emissions that are equivalent to Norwegian emissions in 2030. 

The 2012 agreement on climate policy was signed in connection with the Storting's consideration of Report  21 (2011 – 2012) to the Storting on Norwegian climate policy.  The agreement also built on the 2008 agreement on climate policy, that was signed in connection with the consideration of Report no. 24 (2006-2007) to the Storting on Norwegian climate policy from 2007. In addition to the overarching objectives on emission reductions, through the agreement on climate policy there is a consensus on a series of measures that will be implemented in Norway. These include:

  • Implementing climate and technology investment, funded through the yield from a new fund for climate, renewable energy and energy restructuring.
  • Phasing out fossil heating oil.
  • Stricter energy requirements for the building sector.
  • Continuing to increase climate research.
  • Maintaining or increasing the carbon stores in the forest.
  • Contributing to developing biogas in Norway.
  • Seeking to ensure that the growth in passenger transport in the city areas is absorbed by public transport, bicycles and walking.
  • The car taxes shall be used to contribute to getting a more environmentally- and climate-friendly vehicle fleet.
  • Strengthening the role of the railway in the transport system.

The 2012 agreement on climate policy

In April 2012, Stoltenberg's second government presented the Report to the Storting “Norwegian climate policy” (”Norsk Klimapolitikk”), also called the Report to the Storting on climate efforts. It describes key climate policy principles, goals for emission reductions and contains a review of the various sectors in the economy. The report builds on the first agreement on climate policy and includes follow-up of the specific items from the agreement in 2008.

The Report to the Storting on climate efforts was considered by the Storting in June 2012 and the result of the negotiations on the Report to the Storting on climate efforts is what we call the agreement on climate policy. 14 proposals for climate measures were approved which, in conjunction with the Report to the Storting on climate efforts, form the basis for Norwegian climate policy. 

The 2008 agreement on climate policy

The first Norwegian agreement on climate policy was adopted in 2008. The basis for the negotiations was the Stoltenberg government's Report to the Storting on climate efforts Report no. 24 (2006-2007) to the Storting on Norwegian climate policy and a list of requirements with 61 items compiled by the opposition parties the Conservative Party of Norway, the Christian Democrats and Venstre (social liberal party). 

Through “The agreement on the climate report” the parties reached agreement on a number of basic principles that should form the basis for Norwegian climate policy.

  • The principle that the polluter pays.
  • The precautionary principle.
  • General measures shall be key.
  • The climate policy must substantially reduce emissions both in Norway and abroad.
  • The opportunity to use other measures in addition to quotas and taxes.
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