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Vaccines and therapeutic medicines

This content is more than 4 months old. The information may therefore be out of date. You will find updated information on Topic Page The coronavirus situation.

Vaccines are the most effective preventative measures against pandemics, which is why Norway is highly involved in the effort to develop a vaccine against the coronavirus. Norway also seeks to ensure that any new vaccine will be distributed fairly, so poor countries will be able to employ it.

Cepi

Norway has increased vaccine-development funding to the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (Cepi) by NOK 2.2 billion for the 2020–2030 period. This is in addition to NOK 1.6 billion in support for 2017 to 2025.

After meeting with Cepi Chief Executive Officer Richard Hatchett in January, Prime Minister Erna Solberg and Minister of International Development Dag-Inge Ulstein launched a concerted effort to mobilise funding from donors. A number of countries have since joined the Norwegian appeal.

Vaccination programmes/Gavi

Norway is one of the three largest contributors to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, which purchases vaccines and helps to strengthen vaccination programmes and health systems in low-income countries. Gavi will be crucial to distribution of a future Covid-19 vaccine to poor countries. Norway provided NOK 6.25 billion to Gavi from 2016 to 2020.

Research on medicines for Covid-19

The Research Council of Norway will spend up to NOK 100 million on anti-coronavirus measures. Some of this funding will go to the World Health Organization (WHO) for its work on testing Covid-19 treatments and for coronavirus research of special relevance to low-income countries. Norway is contributing both money and expertise to this effort. The international study is being coordinated by the Research Council’s Chief Executive Officer, John-Arne Røttingen.