The coronavirus situation: Questions and answers about entry to Norway

Corona information is frequently changed and may therefore be out of date.

You will find updated news from the Government on Topic Page The coronavirus situation. General information about the coronavirus can be found on Helsenorge.no.

In a normal everyday life with increased emergency preparedness, the entry restrictions will be gradually lifted through three phases. The first phase began 25 september 2021. Below are questions and answers about entering Norway, after this date.



Questions and answers about entering Norway

EEA nationals, people from other countries who reside in the EEA, people residing in the UK and Switzerland and people who live in purple countries, i.e. countries outside the EEA/Schengen area which the Norwegian Institute of Public Health has determined can have slightly lighter restrictions may enter Norway.

Entry restrictions will continue to apply for people coming from all other countries (grey countries). However, there are several exemptions:

  • Foreign nationals who are fully vaccinated or who have recovered from COVID-19 in the past 6 months and who can document this with a verifiable COVID-19 certificate that is connected to the EUDCC gateway (see Appendix D of the COVID-19 Regulations)
  • minors travelling together with their parents, if the parents are exempt from travel restrictions because they have a COVID-19 certificate
  • minors travelling to Norway together with their parents, if the parents are exempt from travel restrictions on grounds other than a COVID-19 certificate 
  • foreign students with a place at a Norwegian educational institution
  • PhD students at Norwegian educational or research institutions
  • foreign nationals who are visiting or will be staying with close family members in Norway: 
    • foreign nationals who have a family immigration permit
    • foreign nationals who are the spouse/registered partner/cohabitant, minor or adult child or step-child of Norwegian citizens, if the family lives together abroad and they are travelling together with the Norwegian citizen or are joining this person in Norway
    • foreign nationals who are the spouse/registered partner/cohabitant, minor or adult child or step-child of a foreign worker who is an EEA national who does not reside in Norway, when these family members travel to Norway together with the EEA national or are joining this person in Norway
    • foreign nationals, regardless of the country they are a citizen of or reside in, that have one of the following relationships with a person residing in Norway: spouse/registered partner/cohabitant, minor or adult child and step-child and parent and step-parent of a minor or adult child/step-child, grandparent and step-grandparent, grandchild and step-grandchild, romantic partner over the age of 18 (this is following an application-based scheme for prior approval for visits from romantic partners) and a romantic partner’s minor child
  • foreign nationals who are arriving for a contact visit with their children
  • foreign nationals for whom there are special reasons for granting entry, such as special care responsibilities for people in Norway or other compelling compassionate grounds
  • asylum seekers and resettlement refugees
  • people belonging to certain professions: journalists, maritime and aeronautical personnel, freight and passenger traffic, diplomats and military personnel, Sami people engaged in reindeer husbandry, researchers, and crew on a marine research cruise
  • foreign nationals whose presence is strictly necessary in order to maintain sound operation of critical societal functions or safeguard the basic needs of the population
  • foreign nationals invited by the Norwegian authorities and employees of international organisations
  • foreign nationals in transit at an airport in Norway (both international airport transit and within the Schengen area)
  • foreign nationals with permanent residence in Svalbard or who need to travel via the Norwegian mainland on their way to or from their work or place of residence on Svalbard

The general conditions regarding the right to enter and stay in Norway in the Immigration Act must be met. For example, foreign nationals who are subject to a duty to hold a visa must be granted such a visa before they can travel here.

Norwegian citizens are always permitted to enter Norway.

Measures including mandatory testing, entry registration and quarantine continue to apply to some.

Yes, from 25 September, all EEA citizens, including people from other countries resident in the EEA, in the United Kingdom and Switzerland, plus foreigners living in purple countries can enter Norway. If grandparents or romantic partners come from so-called 'gray countries' (ie all other countries), there are exceptions from the entry restrictions:

Foreigners, who have the following relationship with a person resident in Norway:

  • Spouse / registered partner 
  • cohabitant minors or adult children / stepchildren,
  • parents and grandparents of minors or adult children / stepchildren,
  • grandparents and grandparents, grandchildren and great-grandchildren,
    romantic partners over 18 years (via an application-based scheme for prior consent to romantic partner's visits) and romantic partners minors can enter.

Yes, foreign students with a place at a Norwegian educational institution and PhD students at Norwegian educational or research institutions are among the exemptions from the entry restrictions.

Travel quarantine is not required for travelers arriving from green and orange countries and areas, but travellers arriving from red, dark red, purple (countries which the Norwegian Institute of Public Health considers to have an acceptable  infection rate) and grey countries (all other countries) must quarantine. People who are either fully-vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 during the past six months (They must be able to document this by means of a verifiable COVID-19 certificate that is connected to the EUDCC gateway) and children under 18 years are exempt from this requirement. 

As a general rule, travelers that have a duty to be tested, shall do so at the border. 

If there is no test station at the border or the test station is closed, one must get tested with antigen rapid test at a public test station as soon as possible, and no later than 24 hours after arrival. 

There will still be a requirement to test at the border at border crossings where there is a test station. This will apply, for example, to all airports with foreign traffic, like Svinesund and Storskog.

 

All internal border crossing points are open, as of midnight 6. October. There are still requirements for testing at the border for some groups of travelers.

 

Only travellers who are subject to the duty to quarantine and/or the duty to take a test must register. Children under 16 years and those who are either fully-vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 during the past six months are exempt from this requirement.

The website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health contains constantly updated information about the status of the different countries. Please note that the situation can change.

 

Yes, you may implement the travel quarantine in your own home or another suitable place of residence. Travelers that lack a suitable accommodation, will be offered to implement the travel quarantine at a quarantine hotel. The municipality is responsible for organising the quarantine hotel. 

You can find an overview of quarantine hotels in different municipalities here.