Enable Javascript in your browser for an improved experience of regjeringen.no

How will Brexit affect British citizens living in Norway?

Information for British citizens and their family members living in Norway.

This information will be updated regularly.

The UK has left the EU. British citizens are no longer citizens of the EU, and the UK is no longer a member of the European Economic Area (EEA).

On 31 January 2020, the UK left the EU, with a Withdrawal Agreement in place. Under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement, there will be a transition (or implementation) period, during which much will remain the same.

The transition period is due to last until 31 December 2020, but it may be extended if the EU and the UK agree to this. The Storting (Norwegian parliament) has adopted an act that makes a transition period applicable in Norway too. During the transition period, the UK will be treated as if it were still a member of the EU and EEA. The rules on free movement will continue to apply, and the rights of British citizens and their family members in Norway will remain unchanged during this period.

Norway and the other EEA EFTA States have now signed an agreement with the UK (the EEA EFTA Separation Agreement) that, among other things, safeguards the rights of British citizens and their family members living in Norway and similarly protects the rights of EEA EFTA citizens living in the UK. The Separation Agreement largely mirrors the Withdrawal Agreement reached between the EU and the UK. The purpose of the Separation Agreement is to ensure that British citizens who are living in an EEA EFTA country at the end of the transition period can continue to do so and will continue to enjoy broadly the same rights as they do now. 

Detailed information about Norway and Brexit can be found on the Government’s website: regjeringen.no. The UK Government has also published guidance for UK nationals living in Norway

The EU and the UK have approved the Withdrawal Agreement. Consequences for UK nationals in Norway.

In December 2018, Norway and the other EEA EFTA States announced that they had reached an agreement with the UK (the EEA EFTA Separation Agreement) on protecting citizens’ rights and resolving separation issues arising from the UK’s exit from the EU. This Separation Agreement largely mirrors the Withdrawal Agreement between the EU and the UK.

Part Two of the Separation Agreement between the EEA EFTA States and the UK, on citizens’ rights, will enter into force at the end of the transition period. Under Part Two of the Agreement, British citizens and their family members will, subject to certain conditions, be able to continue to live and work in Norway after the end of the transition period, provided that they were legally residing in Norway, in accordance with the EU’s Free Movement Directive, before the end of the transition period.

British citizens in Norway will retain the right to family reunification that they have under current EEA legislation, provided that that the family relationship is established before the end of the transition period, i.e. by 31 December 2020. This also applies to children born or adopted after the end of the transition period. 

British citizens and their family members who want to live or work in Norway after the end of the transition period will be subject to the same rules as non-EEA/EU citizens (as set out in the Norwegian Immigration Act).

Questions about Norwegian citizenship

The processing of applications for Norwegian citizenship for British citizens will not be affected by Brexit. The UDI (Directorate of Immigration) processes applications for Norwegian citizenship in the order in which they are received. There will be no special priority scheme for applications from British citizens. You can check the average processing time for applications for Norwegian citizenship on the UDI website. 

On 6 December 2018, the Storting adopted a resolution allowing dual citizenship for anyone who is or wishes to become a Norwegian citizen. This means that you will no longer have to renounce your current citizenship in order to become a Norwegian citizen.  More information is available on the UDI website.

Find out more about the rules for Norwegian citizenship here.

***

  • Updated 1 February 2020: Updated to reflect the fact that the UK left the EU with a Withdrawal Agreement in place.
  • Updated 17 January 2020: Up-to-date information on dual citizenship added.
  • Updated 5 November 2019: Link to temporary regulation on the right of continued residence for British citizens and their family members.
  • Updated 18 March 2019: Information added on the use of British driving licences after Brexit.
  • Updated 7 March 2019: Information added on the documents needed to confirm right of residence.

 

Go to the top