Information about international travel and the coronavirus

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is maintaining its global advice against all non-essential travel to all countries outside the EU/EEA, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Exceptions have been made for certain countries and regions outside the EU. This advice currently applies until 1 October 2021. The infection situation and local restrictions can change very quickly. Anyone considering a trip abroad should think carefully about whether it is necessary to travel.

If you are a Norwegian citizen in need of urgent or special assistance, you should contact the nearest embassy or the Foreign Service Response Centre by phone on +47 23 95 00 00 or by e-mail: 247@mfa.no. We recommend that Norwegian citizens who travel abroad register their trips in the travel information portal, www.reiseregistrering.no, and update the information as necessary (service in Norwegian only).

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs issues official travel advice whenever there is reason to advise people against travelling to a specific country, area or region, or to advise them to leave. Official travel advice is issued and rescinded on the basis of an overall assessment of the safety and security situation in a particular country or area. It is important to note that the Ministry’s travel advice is advisory; there is no ban on travel. The Ministry can never guarantee that it is safe to travel or to stay somewhere. It is up to each individual to decide whether or not to travel.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is maintaining its global advice against non-essential travel to countries outside the EU/EEA, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Exceptions have been made for certain countries and regions that either are or have been included on EU’s list of epidemiologically safe third countries.

In addition to the EU/EEA, Switzerland and the UK, the following countries and regions are excepted from the Ministry’s global travel advice: Albania, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Israel, Japan, Kosovo, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan, Ukraine and the US.

  1. The EU/EEA countries, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.
  2. The following countries and regions that are or have been included on the EU’s list of safe third countries: Albania, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canada, Israel, Japan, Kosovo, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine and the US.

This should not be taken as encouragement to travel. If the level of infection in a country rises above a certain threshold, the Ministry may reintroduce advice against travel to that country. Please note that you are required to go into quarantine if you have visited some of these countries and regions, even though there are no travel restrictions in place for them. For more details see here (Norwegian only). If you return to Norway from a country or region that has developed a high level of infection during your stay, you risk being required to go into quarantine on your return.

 

Many people in Norway have now been vaccinated and Norway has a good overview over the infection situation in countries in the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK and certain countries and regions outside the EU. This has made it possible to withdraw the travel advice for these countries and regions. Moreover, Norway is now connected to the EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) solution which makes travelling to and from certain countries easier.

The Norwegian authorities have decided to withdraw the travel advice for these countries and regions because travel to these places is now associated with a lower level of risk than previously. Nonetheless, anyone who is planning to travel abroad should make sure that they have valid travel insurance, and should closely monitor and follow the rules and guidelines that apply at their planned destination. The situation has not yet returned to normal even though the travel advice has been changed.

The Institute of Public Health will also be assessing the infection situation in specific regions, such as for certain islands and archipelagos in Europe, in order to determine the quarantine requirements for travellers returning to Norway from these regions. This means that these regions may be given a different classification from the countries they are part of. For instance, the island of Corfu could be classified as ‘green’ even though Greece as a country has been classified as ‘red’. The Institute will publish information about the specific islands and archipelagos involved on a regular basis.

If you are arriving in Norway from a green country you are not required to go into quarantine. People arriving from a country or region classified as ‘red’ (or orange or purple) by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health are still required to go into quarantine when they return home to Norway. Certain exceptions are in place. A map showing the status for entry quarantine of countries/regions is available on the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

The pandemic is not over. The situation for travel abroad has not yet returned to normal, and after many months of advice against non-essential travel to all countries, the authorities are seeking to ease restrictions gradually. The health authorities have a good overview over the situation in the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK, and a system for a European COVID-19 certificate has been in place since 24 June.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has rescinded its travel advice for certain countries and regions that are or have been included on the EU’s list of epidemiologically safe third countries, classified as ‘purple’ countries. This has been decided on the basis of a comprehensive assessment of the situation in these countries and regions, including an assessment by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health using the criteria set for infection levels. When necessary, travel advice may be reintroduced for individual countries or regions for reasons relating to:

  • information about the infection situation in the country or region;
  • the emergence of virus mutations in the country or region
  • a lack of reliable data from the country or region; 
  • the proportion of travellers arriving from that country or region who test positive after their arrival in Norway; 
  • pressure on or the collapse of the relevant health services

The list that Norway uses to classify these countries has been created by the EU. This list is reviewed periodically, and countries may be both added to it and removed.

The global travel advice against non-essential travel to all countries, with the exception of the countries in the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK and certain countries and regions outside the EU, currently applies until 1 October. The Ministry will review the global travel advice in the course of September.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs first issued global travel advice against non-essential travel to all countries on 14 March 2020.

Starting on 15 June 2020, exceptions to the travel advice have been made for Nordic countries and areas meet the criteria for infection levels set by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

From 15 July 2020, exceptions have been made for countries and regions in the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK that meet the criteria for infection levels set by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

From 5 July 2021, the travel advice was rescinded for the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK, and for certain countries on the EU’s list of epidemiologically safe third countries.

The global travel advice has been extended several times, and currently applies until 1 October 2021.

If you travel to a country or region that has been classified as ‘red’ you must go into quarantine when you return to Norway. This applies regardless of whether the country or region that you have visited allows Norwegians to enter and move about freely.

There are somewhat less stringent restriction for entry into Norway for some groups from certain countries and regions outside the EU/EEA/Schengen area/UK, including romantic partners and grandparents. For more information, see here.

When travelling with children, it is important to check the rules that apply to quarantine/COVID-19 certificates for children at your planned destination.

In Norway, vaccinations are in general not available to anyone under the age of 18, so this age group does not have access to COVID-19 certificates. However, minors who have recovered from COVID-19 or have been vaccinated for various reasons may obtain a COVID-19 certificate.

Children who have not been vaccinated or cannot document that they have recovered from COVID-19 must go into quarantine even when they are travelling with adults who are fully vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19.

As a rule, minors (children under the age of 18) arriving in Norway are not required to stay at a quarantine hotel. However, they are still subject to travel quarantine, and it must be possible for them to complete their quarantine at another suitable location. This does not mean that parents travelling with minors are exempted from the requirement to stay at a quarantine hotel. If the parents of the minor(s) involved are required to stay at a quarantine hotel, the minor(s) will be able to stay with them. See here for more information: Travel to Norway - regjeringen.no

The requirement to go into quarantine for 10 days no longer applies to people who enter Norway from regions in the other Nordic countries that meet the Norwegian Institute of Public Health’s criteria.

Norwegians travelling in the other Nordic countries must make sure that they know what the current rules are in the regions they are visiting and obey them.

Changes to the travel advice may affect your travel insurance coverage. You should contact your travel insurance company to check whether your travel insurance is still valid for the country you are in, and what coverage it provides.

If the infection situation deteriorates so much that the country no longer meets the criteria set by the Institute of Public Health, you will have to go into quarantine when you return to Norway. For more information, see the website of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

 

Travel advice is advisory. It is not a ban. However, if you travel to a country against the Ministry’s advice, there may be implications for your travel insurance. You should also be aware that the Foreign Service’s capacity to provide consular assistance may be limited in countries for which travel advice has been issued. At worst, the Foreign Service will not be able to provide consular assistance if you have problems.

Updated information on questions regarding quarantine and entry to Norway can be found on these web pages: Regjeringen.noFolkehelseinstituttetHelsenorge.no and UDI.

Information in English from the Norwegian health authorities can be found on helsenorge.no. Infection control advice related to travel can be found on the website of the Institute of Public Health.

 

 

 

We encourage all Norwegian citizens travelling abroad to register their trips on reiseregistrering.no (in Norwegian only). This will make it possible for the Ministry to get important information to you.

Norwegians on trips abroad should monitor the Ministry’s travel information and information and updates about the coronavirus situation from the Norwegian authorities (Norwegian only). You should also follow any advice and instructions issued by the authorities in the country where you are staying. In addition, you should register your trip using the travel information portal www.reiseregistrering.no so that the Ministry can reach you with updates and information. You should also make sure that your travel insurance is valid at all times.

If you are a permanent resident of another country, you should keep abreast of the situation in the country concerned and follow the advice and instructions of the country’s authorities. You should also make sure that you have the necessary health insurance, and register your information on reiseregistrering.no.

Everyone should make sure they have valid travel insurance. For Norwegian citizens living abroad, various rules apply. More information about health rights abroad is available on helsenorge.no. Tourists and people intending to make short visits to EEA countries or Switzerland should obtain a European Health Insurance Card, which entitles holders to healthcare services on the same conditions as residents of the country they are visiting. More information about the right of pensioners who have moved to another country to hold a European Health Insurance Card can be found on  Pensjonister og Europeisk helsetrygdkort (in Norwegian only).

Any questions about travel insurance should be directed to your travel insurance company.

Many Norwegian embassies and consulates have had to reduce staff as part of their infection control measures. They have temporarily had to close their premises to members of the public. Some matters, for example passport applications, require you to visit the mission in person. This is unfortunately not possible when they are closed to the public. As soon as it is possible to reopen their services to the public, the embassies and consulates will publish information about this on their websites.

Norwegian embassies and consulates will do what they can to assist you. In areas where Norway does not have a mission, we cooperate with the other Nordic countries in order to be able to provide consular assistance to Nordic citizens. This means that you can contact another Nordic embassy if you are in a country where Norway has no representation.

You can find travel information for specific countries on the Ministry’s travel information pages (in Norwegian only).

Before the Ministry issued its global travel advice advising against non-essential travel to all countries, there was travel advice in place for a number of countries and areas based on security and safety assessments. Travel advice issued previously still applies. For many of these countries/areas, the travel advice is stricter than the advice introduced as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

No, European overseas territories outside Europe are not excepted from the travel advice.