OG21 – Oil and gas in the 21st century

The national technology strategy for the oil- and gas sector OG21 was established in 2001. It is organised by way of a board appointed by the government and a secretariat. The main goal of OG21 is to enhance value creation on the Norwegian continental shelf and to promote export of Norwegian oil and gas technology.

OG21 has sucessfully gathered the support of petroleum companies, universities, research institutions and government for a joint national strategy for oil and gas. The unique cooperation within OG21 contributes to maximising the effect and goal- orientation of research in the Norwegian petroleum sector.  

The OG21-strategy was revised in 2012 to address the challenges the sector is facing today. There is still a big potential for developing Norwegian petroleum resources in the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate estimates that less than half of the resources on the Norwegian continental shelf has been exploited. A considerable part of the resources has yet to be discovered. One of the biggest challenges facing the petroleum sector is to develop new, efficient exploration technologies in order to discover new fields worth developing. A second challenge is how to enhance recovery of existing fields. Research and technology will be crucial for both developing resources on the Norwegian shelf and maintaining the  international competitiveness of Norwegian companies within the sector.

The OG21 strategy defines four technological areas crucial for future petroleum activities:

  • Energy efficiency and environmentally sustainable technologies
  • Exploration and enhanced recovery
  • Cost-effective drilling and intervention
  • Future technology for production, prosessing and transport

By November 2016 OG21 will again revise its current strategy.

OG21's main goal is   to promote better and more focused public and private research efforts. OG21 also aims at enhancing cooperation between the different research communities from industry and academia.

Public funding is mainly allocated via the Norwegian Research Council's programs PETROMAKS and Demo 2000, the government's main tool to follow up the national technology strategy.